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Plagiarism  

Learn more about how to avoid plagiarism by scheduling a Plagiarism Education workshop in the LRC or your classroom. Please contact a librarian for more information.
Last Updated: Oct 1, 2013 URL: http://haywood.libguides.com/plagiarism Print Guide RSS Updates
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Consequences of Plagiarism at HCC

Failing grade on an assignment

Failing grade for a course

Loss of scholarship or financial aid

Failure to earn a diploma, certificate, or degree

Academic Honesty:

Students have the responsibility for conducting themselves in such a manner as to avoid any suspicion that they are improperly giving or receiving aid on any assignment or examination. Such academic dishonesty includes cheating (taking another's ideas and presenting them as your own.) Cutting and pasting from the Internet into a paper without proper documentation is considered plagiarism.

-HCC Student Handbook, Academic Policies & Procedures

 

What is Plagiarism?

To Plagiarize¹

--verb: to steal and pass off as one's own (the ideas or words of another) : to use (another's production) without crediting the source : to commit literary theft : to present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source.¹

Basically, plagiarism is fraud. It includes theft and lying about it later.

It's not just failing to cite your sources in a paper. Plagiarism takes many forms, but the most common on college campuses include:

  • downloading a research paper
  • purchasing a paper from a commercial paper mill
  • copying a paper from a friend or classmate
  • copying an article from the web or an online journal or database
  • cutting and pasting information from different sources to create one document
  • faking a citation
  • submitting a paper for one class that you have previously used in another class

¹"Plagiarize." Webster's third new international dictionary of the English language unabridged. Springfield, Mass.: Merriam-Webster, 1986. Print.

 

Anti-Plagiarism Video

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